County governments’ activities are terminated

The Government decided on Jan.12, 2017 that all county government activities shall be terminated on 1 January 2018. The local tasks of the county governments shall be transferred to the local authorities and the state tasks shall be transferred to ministries and existing departments.

Minister of Public Administration Mihhail Korb is of the opinion that the current regional administration arrangements need changing. The county governments today have very few tasks remaining and that volume of tasks is set to be reduced further when after the administrative reform the larger and stronger local authorities are to receive more tasks. “The county government reform will enhance the decision-making rights on the local authority level, establish clarity regarding task distribution between state bodies and remove agency duplicity,” said Minister of Public Administration Mihhail Korb. “At the same time the counties will continue to exist as state administrative units, with the state providing the necessary services to the population. No required state service will disappear, but the service provision quality and availability at county centres will be streamlined. The local authorities will be providing the locally needed services.”

As a result of the reform, the local authorities will be able to engage in planning of county developmental activities, coordination of county cooperation, vital statistics, additional cultural undertakings and regional public transport improvements.

The ministries will be responsible primarily for organisation of supervision in different spheres, land actions, implementation of regional development programmes and compilation of state planning documents.

Preparation for the termination of county government activities has been entrusted to the Ministry of Finance, with March 2017 set as the date for submitting the plan to the Government.

Source: Estonian Ministry of Finance

State revenue was 7.6 pct higher than in 2015

According to the Ministry of Finance, a total of € 8.58 billion of revenue was received by the state in 2016, which is € 603.1 million, or 7.6%, more than the previous year.

“Last year, the state received tax revenue in the amount anticipated in the budget. I am also pleased to note that the expenditures of public authorities were within the budget as usual,” said Sven Sester, the Minister of Finance. “For the future, we hope to increase growth enhancing public investments.”

Tax revenues, including the taxes to be transferred to local authorities, the Unemployment Insurance Fund, the Health Insurance Fund, were received in the amount of € 7.53 billion, which is 5.7% or € 404.1 million more than the previous year.

Social tax receipts increased 6.5% (to € 2.55 billion) and VAT collection improved 5.7% (to € 1.96 billion). Excise duties were collected 11.2% more than a year ago, i.e. a total of € 970.5 million. The revenue from excise duties was affected by the stocking up of alcohol and fuels in anticipation of increases in tax rates in 2017.

The taxes to be transferred to local authorities, the Unemployment Insurance Fund, the Health Insurance Fund, and others were received in the amount of € 1.26 billion, which is 6.5% more than the previous year.

Non-fiscal revenues were received in the amount of € 1.1 billion – € 198.9 million more than in 2015. Of this, € 168.2 million came from the sales of goods and services; the rest of the revenue received was € 127.1 million.

The amount of aid received was € 616.4 million, including € 601.7 million of EU and other external aid, and € 14.6 million of domestic support. In 2016, we received external financing 62.2%, or € 230.8 million, more than in the previous year. The biggest part (298.4 million) or nearly 50% of external financing came from EU structural funds. Furthermore, € 119.7 million came from the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD). Other agricultural payments received amounted to € 134.4 million, of this, € 35.5 million constituted of the instruments of the financial period 2007-2013 received in December.

Overall spending in 2016 came to € 8.56 billion, including € 575.8 million of external financing. Aid payments in the amount of € 4.05 billion, including € 410 million paid from external financing, constituted the bulk of expenditure. Other operating expenses constituted a total of € 2.71 billion, the major share being tax revenue, payments and other charges paid to local authorities, the Health Insurance Fund, the Unemployment Insurance Fund and other relevant authorities.

Labour and administration costs constituted 98.9% of the planned budget. Labour costs increased by 3.4% compared to 2015, constituting € 747.2 million. Administration costs increased 3.5%, constituting € 737.7 million at the end of December.

Last year, € 330.4 million was allocated to investment, which is € 116.1 million less than in the previous year. Public authorities invested, € 299.3 million, i.e. € 38.1 million less than in the previous year. Investment aid was paid in the amount of € 31.1 million. The level of investment was the lowest it had been in the last six years, mainly due to the investments made on account of external financing.

In the previous financial period, in 2007-2013, significantly more external financing was allocated to investments, such as: infrastructure, roads, transport, and real estate. In the current financial period, 2014-2020, more support has been given to services, the labour market, and education measures, cooperation and development programmes, and other development and mentoring programmes targeted to people.

Public authorities planned € 322.9 million in investments during 2016; nearly half of this amount, i.e. € 142.8 million, was invested by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications into the construction and improvement of public roads. Investments have followed a similar trend every year – the spending levels are low in the first five months of the year and payments increase in the second half of the year due to large-scale subcontracting.

External aid was paid in the form of expenses and prepayments, in the amount of € 575.8 million, of which structural aid constituted € 293.2 million. Most disbursements made, were made in the area of government of the Ministry of Rural Affairs: € 228.6 million, the bulk of which constituted payments from the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund in the amount of € 127.2 million. The payments in the area of government of the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications amounted to € 159.9 million, including support to the strengthening of entrepreneurship and the development of transport.

In the current financial period 2014-2020, € 4.4 billion is available to Estonia from the structural and investment funds; additional funding can be obtained under various programmes and from different funds. If Estonian applicants continue to apply successfully, it is estimated that nearly two billion euros could be obtained for the implementation of various projects.

As of the end of December, the treasury held liquid financial assets, i.e. deposits and bonds, in the value of € 1.19 billion, which is € 44.5 million or 3.9% more than in December 2015. The liquidity reserve held € 765.3 million and the stabilisation reserve € 405.9 million.

At the end of November, the nominal general government deficit was € 24.4 million or 0.12% of the GDP. The deficit of the budgets of local authorities amounted to € 65.4 million. The central public deficit was € 86.8 million and the deficit of social security funds was € 3 million.

Source: Estonian Ministry of Finance

The surplus on the current account in August was the largest this year

The flash estimate1 put the Estonian current account at 98 million euros in surplus in August 2016. The surplus on the goods and services account was 139 million euros, which was 36 million euros more than at the same time a year earlier. The growth of 12% in goods exports was faster than the 9% in imports, and this reduced the deficit on the goods account to 33 million euros. One factor that raised activity levels in the external economy was that there were more working days in August 2016 than there were in the previous August. Both exports and imports of services were up 8% and the surplus on the services account widened to 172 million euros. Exports of services were brought down by transport services and boosted by travel services and other services, while imports of all the main types of services increased. The net outflow on the primary and secondary income accounts totalled 41 million euros, which was 5 million euros more than at the same time a year earlier.

The sum total of the current and capital accounts was 110 million euros in August. This means that the Estonian economy was a net lender to the rest of the world, so the country as a whole invested more resources abroad than it received from there.

 

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Source: Bank of Estonia / Eesti Pank Statistics Department

Estonian gross debt level was 10 pct of GDP in 2015

According to the adjusted data of Statistics Estonia, in 2015, the Estonian general government surplus was 0.1% and the gross debt level was 10.1% of the gross domestic product.

At the end of 2015, the total revenues of the general government exceeded the expenditures by 27.2 million euros, accounted as the Maastricht deficit criteria. After a methodological change in the recognition of the contributions to the new public enterprises, the deficit of the central government sub-sector was 52.1 million euros by the end of 2015. The consolidated budget of the local government sector was 55.9 million euros in surplus. The budget surplus of social security funds was 23.4 million euros.

The consolidated debt of the general government (Maastricht debt) amounted to 2 billion euros by the end of 2015. Compared to the preliminary estimate published in March, the central government’s debt compilation was adjusted. From 2012 onwards, the statistical recording of the monetary resources on the Treasury’s group accounts were changed. As a result of this adjustment the central government’s total debt rose to 2.2 billion euros by the end of 2015, caused by the added liabilities towards other subsectors of the general government. This change in accounting of monetary resources of subsectors did not affect the consolidated debt of the general government.

Also, a change was introduced in the statistical recording of the Estonian euro coins, giving rise to the debt level of both the central government subsector as well as the general government  sector by 41.4 million euros at the end of 2015.

The local governments’ debt remained unchanged and accounted for 0.7 billion euros. Social security funds did not contribute to the debt of the general government sector. Changes in accounting were made according to the instructions of Eurostat.Diagram: Surplus/deficit of the general government in Estonia by sub-sectors, 2011–2015

In Estonia, the general government sector comprises three sub-sectors: 1) central government (state budget units and extra-budgetary funds, foundations, legal persons in public law); 2) local governments (city and rural municipality governments with their subsidiary units, foundations); 3) social security funds (Estonian Health Insurance Fund, Estonian Unemployment Insurance Fund).

Source: Statistics Estonia

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The current account surplus was smaller in July than a year ago

The flash estimate1 put the Estonian current account at 45 million euros in surplus in July 2016. The surplus on the goods and services account was 86 million euros, which was 14 million euros less than at the same time a year earlier. The decline of 4.5% in goods exports was faster than the 2.4% in imports, and this increased the deficit on the goods account to 124 million euros. The surplus on the services account is usually at its peak for the year in July because of the tourism season, and the surplus in services was high this year too at 210 million euros. Exports of services were brought down by transport services and boosted by travel services and other services, while imports of all the main types of services increased. The inflows of investment income and other income declined while outflows increased. The net outflow on the primary and secondary income accounts totalled 41 million euros, which was 20 million euros more than at the same time a year earlier.

The sum total of the current and capital accounts was 57 million euros in July. This means that the Estonian economy was a net lender to the rest of the world, so the country as a whole invested more resources abroad than it received from there.

Eesti Pank publishes the flash estimate of the balance of payments monthly for the last month but one. Eesti Pank will publish the balance of payments for the third quarter of 2016 on 9 December 2016.

See a bigger graph from Bank of Estonia website

Estonia’s Health Insurance Fund works with a big loss

For 2016, the government budgeted a loss of around €9m. This gap in the fund’s finances would then have been covered using some of its reserves. But after the first half of the year, the fund is already running at a €33m loss, and about to become a factor in the bugdet discussions for next year.

This loss occurs despite the fact that the number of people insured by the fund has decreased by 15,392 and that revenue from social tax allocated to healthcare has grown by €12.6m, daily Postimees wrote on Friday.

Source: ERR News

The current account surplus was in surplus in May

The flash estimate1 put the Estonian current account at 51 million euros in surplus in May 2016. The surplus on the goods and services account was 64 million euros, which was 51 million euros less than at the same time a year earlier. As goods exports were up 5% over the year and imports were up 10%, the faster growth in imports led the deficit in goods to widen to 105 million euros. The positive balance for services was close to its level of last year at 168 million euros. Exports of services were brought down by transport services and boosted by other services, while imports of transport services increased and those of other services declined. The net outflow of investment income and other income in the primary and secondary income accounts was 12 million euros in May, which is 4 million euros more than a year earlier. This was primarily because less was used in investment and other support from the European Union funds than a year previously.

The sum total of the current and capital accounts was 64 million euros in May. This means that the Estonian economy was a net lender to the rest of the world, so the country as a whole invested more resources abroad than it received from there.

See the graph on Bank of Estonia website