Commercial registers of Estonia, Finland starting on data exchange

Secretary-general at the Ministry of Justice, Tõnis Saar, and director general of the Finnish Patent and Registration Office, Antti Riivari, signed an agreement on Tuesday on the exchange of data between the commercial registers of Estonia and Finland from here on in.

Under the agreement, Estonia and Finland will open their commercial registers for a data exchange that includes all the information typically sent to the authorities of their own country.

On the Estonian side, the authority thus gaining access is the Tartu County Court’s department of registers, and on the Finnish side the Patent and Registration Office. Only individuals tasked with processing the data and who need it for the performance of their daily duties will have access to the information of the other side, and no data will be forwarded to third parties, the ministry said in a press release.

The preparations for the launch of the automatic data exchange have been completed, the x-Road systems of Estonia and Finland have been linked and the proper functioning of services has been tested, the ministry added.

In May 2016 the prime ministers of both countries signed a joint declaration on data exchange and exchanges of e-services between Estonia and Finland. A similar exchange is already ongoing between the Estonian and Finnish tax authorities.

Source: ERR News

Enterprise Estonia to open office on US east coast in 2019

Enterprise Estonia is to open an office on the east coast of the United States in 2019, offering cooperation between US partners in industry and technological development and businesses participating in its business and product development programs.

The exact location of the office has not yet been announced, though cooperation with partners in the state of South Carolina seems to have been the genesis of the move.

“If an Estonian enterprise finds a partner from South Carolina within the framework of this agreement, it will have the option of receiving support from the development program or product development aid to finance the project,” Tanel Rebane, director of the Trade Development Agency at Enterprise Estonia, said.

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The impact of sanctions on Russian and European economies

According to the working papers of Bank of Estonia: The conflict between Russia and Ukraine that started in March 2014 led to bilateral economic sanctions being imposed on each other by Russia and Western countries, including the members of the euro area. The paper investigates the impact of the sanctions on the real side of the economies of Russia and the euro area. The effects of sanctions are analysed with a structural vector autoregression. To pin down the effect we are interested in, we include in the model an index that measures the intensity of the sanctions. The sanction shock is identied and separated from the oil price shock by narrative sign restrictions. We nd a very high probability that Russian GDP declined as a result of the sanctions. In contrast to that, the effects of the sanctions on the euro area are limited to real effective exchange rate adjustments.

Read more from here ( 5/2017 Konstantin A. Kholodilin, Aleksei Netšunajev. Crimea and punishment: The impact of sanctions on Russian and European economies)

Estonia’s Russian-speaking residents against NATO presence

While among Estonian-speaking residents, support for the presence of NATO forces in Estonia is high, the majority of the Russian-speaking population is against it, results of a survey commissioned by the Ministry of Defence show.

Results of the survey show that 69 percent of Estonian residents support the presence of NATO forces in the country, and 23 percent are against it. Two years ago the indicators were 68 percent and 25 percent respectively.

While 89 percent of the Estonian-speaking population support the presence of allied forces and only 6 percent are against it, just 27 percent of the Russian-speaking residents support the presence while 57 percent are against it.

Sociologist Juhan Kivirähk of pollster Turu-uuringute AS that carried out the survey said that this attitude could also be seen looking at attitudes towards Estonia’s being a member of NATO.

The survey was carried out in March. 1,202 Estonian residents were interviewed. Since January 2000 and including this latest one, no fewer than 41 surveys have been conducted to sound out attitudes towards the alliance.

Source: BNS via ERR News

Border maintenance workers arrested by Russian border guard

Two men using a road on Russian territory to get from one Estonian village to another were arrested by Russian border guards on Thursday. Unaware that they had left Estonia, they stopped their vehicle, which according to current agreements between the two countries isn’t allowed. They were subsequently arrested and taken in for identity checks, but allowed to return after paying a fine.

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Nearly half of quota refugees currently not in Estonia

Nearly half of the refugees that have arrived in Estonia under the EU’s migrant distribution plan are not currently in the country and four families that are absent have been away from Estonia for more than 90 days, officials from the Ministry of Social Aaffairs said on Monday.

Triin Raag, head of international protection policy at the Ministry of Social Affairs, told BNS that besides the two families that have previously been known to be outside of Estonia for more than 90 days, another two families have now been away for that long. Both families came to Estonia from Greece this January. The seven-member family was sent to live in Tartu and the five-member family to live in Põlva.

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The immigrants to Estonia mostly come from Finland (45 pct)

According to Statistics Estonia, 14,822 persons immigrated to and 13,792 persons emigrated from Estonia in 2016. Immigration exceeded emigration for the second year. Most of the migrants were Estonian citizens, but their net migration was negative.

The most active group of migrants are 20–39-year-olds. The age group that grows the most in the population due to migration is that of 15–39-year-olds. 60% of the migrants are men and 40% are women. The net migration of men is four times higher than that of women – 800 more men arrived in Estonia in 2016 than left the country, whereas the same number for women was 200.

Most of the migrants are Estonian citizens, but there are more of them among emigrants, causing the net migration of Estonian citizens to be negative by 2,000 persons in 2016. The migrants are Estonian citizens aged 20–59, therefore, the age group of migration is quite large. In net terms, Estonia mainly loses citizens who are in their twenties.

As a result of migration, the number of Ukrainian citizens grew the most in Estonia; 850 more Ukrainian citizens arrived in Estonia in 2016 than left Estonia. In net migration, they were followed by the citizens of the Russian Federation, Finland and Latvia.Immigration by citizenship, 2016

Emigration by citizenship, 2016

The immigrants to Estonia mostly come from Finland (45% of immigrants), Ukraine (11%) and Russia (11%).  88% of the immigrants come from Europe, mainly from the European Union. The main destination country for emigrants is still Finland (58%), followed by the United Kingdom (9%). 94% of the emigrants left to a European country. The immigrants arriving from countries outside Europe have previously lived in the USA, Australia and India. The more popular destinations for emigrants leaving Estonia to non-European countries are Australia and the USA.

The press conference which presents an overview of the 2016 migration trends takes place today, on 23 May at 11 in the 5th floor conference room of Statistics Estonia (Tatari 51).

As of 2015, Statistics Estonia calculates external migration based on the residency index: a person’s transition from (Estonian permanent) resident to non-resident is emigration and the opposite is immigration (unless it is a case of birth or death). As a result, migration flows have increased and this must be taken into account when comparing migration data of 2015 and later to that of previous years. As a result of the changes, Estonia’s external migration also reflects unregistered migration; however, the country of origin and destination of many immigrants and emigrants remains unknown.

Source: Statistics Estonia