The external balance improved last year

Growth in exports of goods and services was faster in the final months of last year than in the preceding quarters, though the developments were different for different groups of goods. So whereas exports of dairy products were around 30% smaller in the fourth quarter of last year than in the same quarter of the previous year for example, growth in exports of goods averaged around 3-4%. Growth was positive even though export prices fell by 3.7%. The growth in the export of goods was aided significantly by an increase in net re-exports. Exports of services also grew strongly in the final months of the year, mainly driven by maritime other transport services and construction services. The goods and services account was again in surplus in the last quarter of the year and the current account as a whole also moved into surplus.

The current account deficit in 2013 stood at 1.1% of GDP, but for 2014 as a whole it was very small, shrinking mainly because of increased exports of services. Growth in domestic demand was modest as companies reduced their investment activity for the second consecutive year, which held back growth in imports and so supported balance in the current account.

A current account that is close to balance means that substantial movement of capital in the financial account is not needed, as there is no need for additional funds from abroad to cover investment. The turnover of transactions, or the inflow and outflow of funds, was actually larger than in 2013 though, probably because of transactions made for liquidity management and financial investment. However, the increased inflow and outflow of funds did not significantly affect investment activity in the private sector last year. The Estonian economy was a net lender in 2014, as it had been in 2013 and by a similar amount, and by the end of the year, the net external debt stood at -9% of GDP.

This meant that the external balance of the Estonian economy improved last year in the figures for both the balance of payments and the international investment position.

 

Source: Bank of Estonia

Author: Andres Saarniit, Economist at Eesti Pank

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