Estonia’s fishing quota for NW, NE Atlantic grows by 200 tons

The permitted total amount of catches of Estonian fishers in Northwestern and Northeastern Atlantic in 2015 will be 200 tons bigger than this year, according to a decision adopted at a meeting of the EU Agriculture and Fisheries Council in Brussels.

The most important for the Estonian fishery sector are catches of redfish, lesser halibut, shrimp, skate and cod in Northwestern and Northeastern Atlantic. Of these species Estonian fishers will be able to catch approximately 3,300 tons, almost 200 tons more than this year, Kaire Martin, head of the department for fish stocks at the Estonian Ministry of Environment, said in a press release.

Since fish stocks in Northwestern Atlantic are recovering, target fishing of flounder was re-opened after a break of almost 20 years. The quota for that species is 1,000 tons, most of which belongs to Canada and Russia. Of EU member states only Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania were assigned a part of the quota — 44 tons each.

The redfish quota for Estonia in Northwestern Atlantic next year is 2,085 tons, 168 tons more than this year. The quota for lesser halibut increased slightly to 313 tons, whereas the quotas for squid and skate were left unchanged at 128 and 283 tons.

In Northeastern Atlantic Estonian fishers mainly catch shrimp in international waters in the Barents Sea and off Greenland. No quota applies to shrimp fishing in the Barents Sea.

As far as other species go, Estonia was assigned a quota for mackerel in the amount of 262 tons, a quota for redfish in Irminger Sea in the amount of 44 tons, as well as by-catch quotas for lesser halibut, skate and blue ling.

An opportunity to harvest redfish in the Norwegian Sea will open up for Estonia next year provided that an international agreement is signed with countries of Northeastern Atlantic. Negotiations are set to start in the first quarter of next year.

Source: Baltic News Service through Estonian Review

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